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They were written to the left of a syllable in vertical writing and above a syllable in horizontal writing.The South Korean government officially revised the romanization of the Korean language in July 2000 to eliminate diacritics.Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents.Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters.English is the only major modern European language requiring no diacritics for native words (although a diaeresis may be used in words such as "coöperation").In some cases, letters are used as "in-line diacritics", with the same function as ancillary glyphs, in that they modify the sound of the letter preceding them, as in the case of the "h" in the English pronunciation of "sh" and "th".In orthography and collation, a letter modified by a diacritic may be treated either as a new, distinct letter or as a letter–diacritic combination.

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In other alphabetic systems, diacritical marks may perform other functions.The shape of the diacritic developed from initially resembling today's acute accent to a long flourish by the 15th century.With the advent of Roman type it was reduced to the round dot we have today.), were used to mark pitch accents in Hangul for Middle Korean.The main use of diacritical marks in the Latin script is to change the sound-values of the letters to which they are added.Examples are the diaereses in the borrowed French words naïve and Noël, which show that the vowel with the diaeresis mark is pronounced separately from the preceding vowel; the acute and grave accents, which can indicate that a final vowel is to be pronounced, as in saké and poetic breathèd; and the cedilla under the "c" in the borrowed French word façade, which shows it is pronounced .Different languages use different rules to put diacritic characters in alphabetical order.

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